Veterans Produce a Film Called “The Betrayal”

Posted on May 17, 2018

SAS and army veterans to name IRA terrorists who escaped justice in new film

Servicemen are producing The Great Betrayal following probe into soldier actions during The Troubles

Former members of the security forces, including SAS veterans, are to name and shame IRA terrorists who escaped justice in a harrowing film.

The servicemen, led by Sutton Coldfield ex-Grenadier Guard Alan Barry, are producing The Great Betrayal as a response to the Parliament-backed investigation into the actions of over 300 retired soldiers in Northern Ireland.

They are furious that, under the terms of the 1997 Good Friday Agreement, IRA killers were freed from jail or handed immunity, yet the door has been left open for soldiers to be prosecuted.

To date only one has been charged, but two former paratroopers are also expected to be brought to court.

The film will give the addresses of those active within the IRA during The Troubles – and also feature interviews with soldiers scarred mentally and physically by Irish terrorists.

Under the banner Justice For Northern Ireland Veterans, this week they launched a crowdfunding page towards the £50,000 cost of the production. They plan to make the documentary available on Netflix, Amazon and on DVD.

News of its release comes in the very month 43 years ago, that 21 people were slaughtered in the Birmingham pub bombings. Those responsible have never been caught.

The film will give the addresses of those active within the IRA during The Troubles – and also feature interviews with soldiers scarred mentally and physically by Irish terrorists.

Under the banner Justice For Northern Ireland Veterans, this week they launched a crowdfunding page towards the £50,000 cost of the production. They plan to make the documentary available on Netflix, Amazon and on DVD.

News of its release comes in the very month 43 years ago, that 21 people were slaughtered in the Birmingham pub bombings. Those responsible have never been caught.

“It will get to the real cost ‘of the acceptable level of violence’, which is how the political classes deemed our losses.

“New estimates put the real casualties at 770 security personnel deaths, 719 deaths of non-military personnel and 6,100 injuries.”

Alan, who was involved in military intelligence during his time in Northern Ireland, said The Great Betrayal is the 22,000-strong group’s response to being “hung out to dry” by the very country they served.

He said: “The terrorists are portraying themselves as heroes, freedom fighters. They are cultivating a Robin Hood image. In fact, they were callous killers. They were no better than ISIS.

“An officer in my own regiment, Captain Robert Nairac, was abducted, tortured and murdered (in 1977) and his body still lies in an unmarked grave.

“Why don’t they give his body back? Because of their warped agenda.

“This is the type of people we are dealing with, yet there are those who think it is acceptable to prosecute soldiers. They hound us, yet let those with blood on their hands walk free.

“And let us not forget that, 43 years ago, bombs were placed in Birmingham pubs that killed and maimed innocent civilians.”

He is also angered by the outcry – in some quarters – that followed the SAS’s elimination of three IRA members in Gibraltar on March 6, 1988.

“The terrorists were going to plant a bomb the following day to blow up a band on The Rock,” he pointed out. “That is why they were rubbed out.”

Alan launched Justice For Northern Ireland Veterans after reading about Dennis Hutchins, a 74-year-old charged with attempted murder. Hutchins was arrested following an investigation into the June 1974 shooting of a Catholic man with learning difficulties.

Justice For Northern Ireland Veterans now has over 22,000 members.

Alan did his first Northern Ireland tour of duty in 1986. A year later, his role in The Troubles became more covert.

Birmingham Mail>

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